Leave it to the Chinese to Retroactively Kill Jeff Carter

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Ahh China.

We'll let reader Gray explain:

On this knock off jersey site – they are selling Wayne Simmonds 2010 Winter Classic Jerseys.

Is Marty McFly screwing around with a Delorean again? This is like when Biff went from drunk middle management to Owner of an auto detailing business because Marty tried to feel up his mom in 1955. Ok it’s not exactly like that, but still.

 

Nice.

Looks like the factory had some leftover One Seven jerseys. And a time machine. Now, if only a score of twenty-something coeds could take a step back in time and swap Carts for Simmonds, well, they might never go back.

You'll get that in a second.

And oh, China, Homer would like to speak with you about this whole time travel thing. There are six years of promises that he would like to take back.

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13 Responses

  1. Kyle, thanks for stealing my “once you go” joke from a previous article. Didnt realize I was now on the payroll.
    And the Chinese sites always make screw ups like this, its great. Peal away the name plate and it may say Carter. Like Henry Rowengartner’s glove…you’ll get it

  2. Holmgren’s Mafia, lighten up. You act like you were the first EVER person to use that joke and haven’t rightfully collected royalties on it. If you’re going to to use someone else’s joke, and a very popular one at that, don’t claim that others are stealing it from you.

  3. HM, how do you “peal” a nameplate?
    peal
    –noun
    1.
    a loud, prolonged ringing of bells.
    2.
    a set of bells tuned to one another.
    3.
    a series of changes rung on a set of bells.
    4.
    any loud, sustained sound or series of sounds, as of cannon, thunder, applause, or laughter.
    –verb (used with object)
    5.
    to sound loudly and sonorously: to peal the bells of a tower.
    6.
    Obsolete . to assail with loud sounds.
    –verb (used without object)
    7.
    to sound forth in a peal; resound.
    Use peal in a Sentence
    See images of peal
    Search peal on the Web
    Origin:
    1350–1400; Middle English pele, akin to peal to beat, strike (now dial.)
    —Related forms
    in·ter·peal, verb (used with object)
    un·pealed, adjective
    —Can be confused:  peal, peel (see synonym note at peel1 ).
    —Synonyms
    4. reverberation, resounding, clangor.

  4. I was only playing with the stealing the joke Kyle…didn’t mean to come off as an ass.
    And evaporation boy, that’s for vocabulary lesson. I think you got what I meant, even after the horrendous misspelling of mine…

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