Category: Eagles (page 2 of 302)

Does DeMarco Murray’s 2014 Workload Threaten His 2015 Season?

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This post is part of The Crosswalk, Crossing Broad’s reader submitted section. While checked for basic quality and readability, it is not edited by Crossing Broad, and all opinions expressed are those of the author, for better or worse. If you’re interested in having your work appear on Crossing Broad, fill out the short sign up form here.

During their weekly radio show, WIP’s Ray Didinger and Comcast Sportsnet’s Reuben Frank (filling in for Glen Macnow) discussed the history of NFL runningbacks that had endured the amount of carries Eagles runningback DeMarco Murray tallied with the Dallas Cowboys last year. It was not very good. Didinger said specifically that “without exception”, backs had experienced a significant dropoff in production the following season. Obviously, this can be a very concerning trend for Eagles fans who are looking for Murray to be the offense’s workhorse after the Eagles made him a marquee signing this offseason in order to replace LeSean McCoy, the Eagles’ all-time leading rusher and a player who happens to be the exact same age as Murray. Murray’s injury history (he has missed 11 games in 4 seasons) is one concern, but so is his task of fully recovering from 392 regular season carries, in addition to 44 postseason attempts.

First, we have to look at the recent history of runningbacks coming off a similar workload. According to Pro Football Reference, 11 players have carried the ball 370 times or more in the regular season since 2000. Larry Johnson’s 416 attempts in 2006 were the most, while Michael Turner’s 376 for Atlanta in 2008 was the most recent example. Here is the entire list: Larry Johnson (2006, 416), Eddie George (2000, 403), DeMarco Murray (2014, 392), Ricky Williams (2003, 392), Jamal Lewis (2003, 387), Edgerrin James (2000, 387), Ricky Williams (2002, 383), Michael Turner (2008, 376), LaDainian Tomlinson (2002, 372), Curtis Martin (2004, 371), Shaun Alexander (2005, 371). Of the nine listed that aren’t Murray or Ricky Williams’ 2003 season (Ricky retired for a year after that season), they missed a combined 37 games the following season, equaling an average of about four games, an astronomical rate.

You could attribute that to the fact that they play a position that seemingly gets hurt more than any other. However, when you look at the durability of these players before their heavy workload seasons, the impacts are even more astounding. Those 9 players missed, in 30 seasons, a combined 41 games, including Jamal Lewis’ 2001 training camp torn ACL that kept him out of the entire season. Those numbers equal just one and one third games missed per season, 2.7 games missed per season lower than the year after their 370+ rushing attempt seasons.

Murray’s workload this season might be another factor to consider. He will most likely not be asked to carry the ball as many times as he was in Dallas, but he is nonetheless Chip Kelly’s featured back in an offense that likes to run a lot of plays, substitute very little on offense, and feature its runningbacks. In Kelly’s first two years with the Eagles, featured back LeSean McCoy did not miss a game and had nearly identical attempts in both seasons (314 in 2013 and 312 in 2014; average of 19.6 per game, although the Eagles ran an average of five fewer plays per game in 2013 than in 2014). Murray’s workload could be less than McCoy’s, however, because of the prominent second back in Ryan Mathews, something McCoy did not have as much of – despite our yearning for more Darren Sproles. Looking at Kelly’s four years with Oregon, I think the carry distribution will most likely resemble that of 2011, when the Ducks featured LaMichael James, Kenjon Barner, and De’Anthony Thomas (this year it will be Murray, Mathews, and Sproles). That season, the Ducks averaged two more plays than last year’s Birds, and if we break down the rushing attempts per play, James equaled .243, Barner rushed at a rate of .150 times per play, and Thomas reached .054 (something to note is that Ducks QB Darren Thomas had many attempts of his own, and is more mobile than Sam Bradford, but Eagles QBs last year rushed 0.047 times per play compared to Thomas’ 0.055 in 2011 – a somewhat meaningless difference).

If we extrapolate those numbers to 70.4 plays per game (the Eagles’ 2014 total), and agree that Murray will serve the LaMichael James role, he will be asked to rush 274 times during the regular season. Of the ten seasons discussed at the beginning, just three of them were followed up with attempts that eclipsed that mark, two by the four backs younger than Murray is now. Maybe Chip believes that a reduced workload can keep Murray on the field this season. Maybe he thinks his sports science can do the trick. History will be against him.

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#CULTURE!!!!!

Voila_Capture 2015-06-17_10-41-55_AM

From ImgurAt this year’s NFLPA rookie premiere, rookies wrote their #1 goal for the season under a polaroid of themselves. Most wrote that they wanted to be in the Super Bowl or Pro Bowl, but look what Nelson Agholor wrote. I love this kid.

I imagine if this were LeSean McCoy, he would’ve written: Lead the league in rushing and use endorsement money to buy a Bentley. You feel me?! Out!

via /r/Eagles

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Chip Kelly vs. Evan Mathis is Starting to Get Ugly

mclane

Raise your hand if you saw this coming, and then put your hand down because you look weird at work.

Evan Mathis is unhappy with the way the Eagles released him, saying they strung him along. According to Zach Berman, Chip Kelly told assembled media that he released Evan Mathis last week because that’s what Mathis wanted. “We were asked by his agent for a release on multiple occasions,” Chip said. “We weren’t coming to a conclusion in terms of a contract extension – we weren’t going to extend any contract or adjust any contract, so we granted what his agent asked for.”

Kelly also said the timing of the release was to give Mathis time to catch on with another team, and because both parties had moved on. But, not so fast.

Mathis told Jeff McLane that he’d wanted to be released, but when he wasn’t and the Eagles made no moves to replace him, he figured he’d still be here. “Drew [Rosenhaus] asked if they weren’t willing to redo my deal, why wouldn’t they release me? But that was in March,” Mathis said. Getting his release back in March would have obviously helped Mathis not only catch on with another team, but also compete for the kinds of deals that other pre-draft free agents get, instead of now looking to catch on as a last-minute addition to a squad. Mathis had also previously said that he was making plans to show up when OTAs became mandatory, before he got the call to say he’d been released.

In yesterday’s Crossing Streams podcast (coming soon), Kyle and I discussed Chip Kelly’s alleged racism and handling of former players. And it might not be that he’s racist, or that he’s a coach who requires a certain type of guy, he just may be completely without grace when it comes to moving on from a player. That’s fine. But it’s not a good look. Especially in this case, where Kelly seems to think – or at least claim – he did Mathis a favor, when in reality he did the exact opposite.

Kyle: I’m buying what Chip is selling, but eventually this stuff comes back to bite you. DeSean release is a mess. LeSean trade is a mess. Cary Williams is an ass. And now Mathis, too, is a mess. You get a reputation, fair or unfair. Chip’s seems to be becoming: that guy is unreasonable. That’s not good.

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Nike is Still Using Shady to Sell You Eagles Jerseys

shady

What better way to sell an Eagles jersey than to use the (former) player who can’t stop shit-talking the coach. It’s almost difficult to be this incompetent.

[h/t r/Eagles]

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The Eagles Have Released Evan Mathis

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Ian Rappppppppppppppppppoport the first to reppppppppppport the news.

Sounded like he was done the other day once these quotes came out.

UPDATE: Thank you, Geoff Mosher, for you confirmation of this:

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Jordan Matthews, Year 2: What Should We Expect?

Photo Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

Photo Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports


Crosswalk

This post is part of The Crosswalk, Crossing Broad’s reader submitted section. While checked for basic quality and readability, it is not edited by Crossing Broad, and all opinions expressed are those of the author, for better or worse. If you’re interested in having your work appear on Crossing Broad, fill out the short sign up form here.

67 catches, 872 yards, and 8 TDs. That was the production last season from Jordan Matthews, the rookie wideout who played the majority of his snaps in the slot. In his second season, what can we expect from Matthews? Those numbers are typically considered to be phenomenal production from a rookie, but in the midst of last year’s possible “Greatest Ever” WR draft class, Matthews didn’t shine as much as Sammy Watkins, Mike Evans, or Odell Beckham.

A breakdown of the rookie wide receivers is below:
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Three Former Philly Players Who You’re Mad Have a Championship or a Chance at One

Photo Credit: Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

Photo Credit: Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

Crosswalk

This post is part of The Crosswalk, Crossing Broad’s reader submitted section. While checked for basic quality and readability, it is not edited by Crossing Broad, and all opinions expressed are those of the author, for better or worse. If you’re interested in having your work appear on Crossing Broad, fill out the short sign up form here.

1. Patrick Chung– The guy couldn’t stop a fast middle schooler from getting into the end zone in an Eagles jersey but then he jumps on the first bus out of Philly and rides it all the way to the Super Bowl. (I tried so hard to put a deflate joke in here but couldn’t find the right one.)
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15 Things You May Not Know About Sam Bradford

Photo Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

Photo Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

Crosswalk

This post is part of The Crosswalk, Crossing Broad’s reader submitted section. While checked for basic quality and readability, it is not edited by Crossing Broad, and all opinions expressed are those of the author, for better or worse. If you’re interested in having your work appear on Crossing Broad, fill out the short sign up form here.

Sam Bradford looks to be the Eagles quarterback. Our collective Super Bowl hopes and dreams rest in his and Chip Kelly’s hands. We know he’s had injuries. We know he’s a former Heisman Trophy winner. However, you might not know these things about Sam Bradford:

1. The origins of the surname Bradford may have meant Sam was destined for Philadelphia. The ancient name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is often linked to the city of Bradford in West Yorkshire. Bradford comes from Olde English (pre 7th Century) “brad” meaning broad.

As in Broad Street?

Ford can mean “crossing a shallow area of water.” However the origins of ford go back to the Old English word faran, which means to go. 

Basically, Bradford means “to go Broad.” Could this mean Sam is destined for a Super Bowl parade down Broad Street?

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